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Paul Pruchnic

Paul Pruchnic

I graduated from the 200 hour Dayton Method Teacher Training Program in summer 2010. Over the years I’ve tried various types of yoga, and I prefer the Dayton method over all others. Besides having the time to do it, I had the funds and I simply wanted to challenge myself to take my practice to a higher level. It was nothing like I thought it would be. I went into it apprehensively, and came out a true believer in not only the method but the veracity of the teacher. Hopefully this doesn’t sound too trite, but I honestly learned a lot about acceptance, patience, and understanding. The program gave me more confidence in myself as a person and now I’m not so hard on myself when I fail to meet my own expectations. On a cognitive level I always knew that it’s not good to hang on to regrets. But the training helped me become more aware of the ways in which I was doing just that.

The awareness is the beginning of the freedom from the old mindsets that no longer serve us. Only then can the real work begin. If this sounds like a big deal, it is! Yes, it’s life changing, but only if you give it your all; like Jason said, “you get out of it what you put in to it (the training)” This is so true. The small group was awesome. I was one of two males taking the class, and I’m kind of glad I wasn’t the only guy in the group, but even if I had been the only male, I don’t think it would have been an issue. Spending so much time together, you become like a little family of sorts. Regarding Jason, see question 3. The guy is one of the most genuine person I have had the pleasure of getting to know. And he certainly knows both the art and science of Yoga. Because of the clinics, I have a better understanding how to properly perform the postures. As a result of the anatomy I have a greater understanding of what’s going on inside the body while performing the postures. The philosophy classes were intellectually stimulating without being “propagandistic” towards any particular philosophy; I was pleased that the philosophy instructor had an open mind and did not, in any way whatsoever attempt to force her personal world-views on anyone. And who can forget the bliss of “yoga nidra”? I learned the true meaning of those overused buzzwords; Acceptance, Patience, and Understanding. Most of all I learned to live my own life; my new motto is “I refuse to let others dictate how I feel about myself.”

I’m not teaching yoga anywhere right now, that was never the point or even the goal for me. But I can honestly say that the training and what I brought from it has made me a better High School History teacher and that’s a fact! Of course I would recommend the Dayton method teacher training, but only if you want to improve the quality of your life.